A Run for Your Money

1949

Comedy

1
IMDb Rating 6.6 10 515

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Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
April 02, 2021 at 05:10 AM

Director

Cast

Alec Guinness as Whimple
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
768.11 MB
956*720
English 2.0
NR
24 fps
1 hr 23 min
P/S counting...
1.39 GB
1424*1072
English 2.0
NR
24 fps
1 hr 23 min
P/S counting...

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by crossbow0106 9 / 10

A Well Made British Comedy

This story is about two Welsh brothers who are miners from an unpronounceable place in Wales who win a contest to go to London to see a rugby match. Part of the winnings are 200 pounds, a considerable sum in those days. The pair arrive, completely miss the otherwise disinterested gardening columnist asked to give them the prize (a great Alec Guiness) and go to the city. They meet up with Jo (the beautiful Moira Lister) and it turns out she is a scam artist and wants the money, so she becomes closer to the naive Dai. The brothers end up losing each other, with Twm meeting up with an old friend from their town. Hee helps him get back his pawned harp. The film goes from there, the brothers trying to find each other, Jo trying to get the 200 pounds and the columnist trying to endure this, being clearly out of his element. This is a very good film, comic, dramatic and even touching. The last half hour is excellent as you see how the story unfolds. If you like British film, especially classic British film, I highly recommend this.

Reviewed by intelearts 9 / 10

477th Review: Welsh choirs, post-war optimism, and Alec Guinness...joy!

This is a wonderful early post-war example of what would become staple 1950s comedies - one of the first from Ealing Studios - it has an innocence and freshness, as well as genuine laughs and charm, that hold up well nearly 70 years later.

Two Welsh miners win the Daily Echo's prize for the most productive miners in Britain and head up to London to collect the enormous sum of £200 - as innocents in London they get separated and the one meets a gorgeous girl on the make, and the other a broken-down Welsh harpist. They are all chased by a bemused Alec Guinness as the gardening correspondent out of his métier.

All in all this foreshadows the great comedies of the 1950 - but it is a very lovely example of the genre - full of joy, energy, even some farce, and lots of very beautiful music - this is one to enjoy with a nice cup of tea and a roaring fire!

Reviewed by ackstasis 8 / 10

"How much I prefer vegetables to human beings…"

There's plenty to love about the Ealing Studios comedies of the late 1940s and early 1950s. There's a certain laid-back attitude towards all the stories, rarely falling back upon melodrama and maintaining a solid feeling of everyday realism – the humour is much more akin to the Australian style of comedy rather than the American, and that certainly appeals to me. Charles Frend's 'A Run for Your Money' is an undiscovered gem – a term I suspect I'll be using to describe a lot of the Ealing Studio's films – from 1949. The simple story concerns Tom and David Jones, two mining brothers from the quaint Welsh town of Hafoduwchbenceubwllymarchogcoch, who win a newspaper award, and so travel to London for the first time to claim their $200 prize. Once there, the two enthusiastic young men waste no time in getting separated, and their eventful day consists of numerous coincidences, near-misses, the reacquisition of a harp, a rugby match, the boss' bowler hat, and a cunning female con-artist who tries to relieve David of his money.

This is how I like comedy the best: simple, fun and effective. The two Welsh brothers (Meredith Edwards and Donald Houston playing Tom and David, respectively) are a pair of likable larrikins, though David (called by his nickname, "Dai Number 9") is naive to the point of gullibility, and Tom ("Twm") finds it difficult to say no to a drink at any time of the day. Alec Guinness has a brilliant supporting role as Whimple, the gardening-columnist who is instructed by his newspaper editor (Clive Morton) to escort the men about London. Interestingly, he is a sort of Clouseau-esquire figure, filled with a bloated sense of self-importance that is punctuated by, above all else, his terrible luck. Fittingly, and to our great amusement, the story eventually winds up with Whimple receiving the raw end of the deal, despite his best intentions. Moira Lister is adequate as Jo, the sweet-talking Londoner who tries to scam the credulous David out of the $200 prize money.

I also noticed some solid comparisons between 'A Run for Your Money' and director Frank Capra, and the sub-plot of the female con-artist finding the heart to redeem herself was reminiscent of Jean Arthur in 'Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936).' Additionally, Capra always had a talent for celebrating of the "common man," a notable example being the singing on the night bus in 'In Happened One Night (1934).' This film follows a similar sort of path: Tom and David Jones certainly represent this noble "every-man" - they are first sighted hundreds of metres underground, as cheery, hard-working labourers in the mine, with sweaty hands and blackened faces. Director Charles Frend also uses a merry song to emphasise the magnificence of the small-town folk of Wales. On the train to and from London, the hundreds of good-natured Welshmen join each other in a jubilant chant, a symbol of their togetherness as a people. Conversely, the uptight folk of the big city prohibit music in their pubs, and, on one of the London trains, a simple request for directions leads to a heated dispute over the most efficient route to Twickenham.

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