Creatures the World Forgot

1971

Action / Adventure / Horror / Sci-Fi

Plot summary


Uploaded by: FREEMAN
August 04, 2022 at 04:02 AM

Director

Top cast

720p.BLU 1080p.BLU 720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
876.97 MB
1280*694
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
1 hr 35 min
P/S 38 / 106
1.59 GB
1920*1040
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
1 hr 35 min
P/S 63 / 119
876.59 MB
1280*714
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
1 hr 35 min
P/S 4 / 21
1.59 GB
1920*1072
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
1 hr 35 min
P/S 21 / 26

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Leofwine_draca 4 / 10

Hammer's prehistoric epic, but there are no dinosaurs and it's not very good

Hammer's third foray into prehistoric adventure (following ONE MILLION YEARS BC and WHEN DINOSAURS RULE THE EARTH) is a dismal, low-rent affair, lacking in any artistic flair and any imagination. This time, the budget excluded any Harryhausen-produced dinosaurs (come to think of it, even the papier mache perils of THE LAND THAT TIME FORGOT might have come in handy), instead concentrating on the exploitation features of nudity and barbarism.

Much of the fun to be had watching this film is the novelty value (although the film isn't original) of watching a bunch of hairy men and women running around, grunting and fighting indiscriminately. Not a single word is spoken during the course of the film, so events are depicted entirely through visual means of communication. This soon becomes tiring and boring to watch, as it takes about half an hour of set-up for the plot to really begin.

It's a muddled affair, concerning a pair of twin brothers who are caught up in destiny and other mumbo-jumbo courtesy of an annoyingly camp shaman who hangs around for the entire length of the film (all other characters from the beginning of the film have either died or moved on by this point), waving a bloody whip and making me wish I was there to beat the living daylights out of him. Not much of the film makes sense, and the plot is minimalistic to say the least. Mostly, it's concerned with people running around and hitting each other with sticks. Like an early version of TV game show GLADIATORS, if you will.

The acting is sub-par all round, with not even a name star making a guest appearance. The best they can do with is Julie Ege (THE MUTATIONS), left to supply the glamour interest, although she doesn't have a big role and pervy viewers will be disappointed that she doesn't shed her fur bikini either (although lots of other girls do, their faces conveniently obscured by hair - I wonder why?). All of the men in the film look exactly the same, with long brown hair and bushy brown beards, with the exception of the aforementioned shaman and the hero, a guy with blond hair (dyed) for a change. He is played by a young-looking Richard Branson.

The special effects are used sparingly, something which we ought to count ourselves lucky for, as what brief back projection work there is, is simply appallingly bad. There is some gore (controversial for the time, tame for today's standards), mostly consisting of blood-covered people, although a standout scene involves a man's nose being bitten off by another man. To make up for the effects, there is some nice scenery work (it was filmed on location in South Africa, so expect miles of desert and sand), although it has to be said, that by the end we're sick of it.

The perils in this film are hilariously bad. One bear is blatantly a man in a suit, and makes no attempt to be anything else. A tribe of squat, scary, Neanderthal men look more like they need a bath than being terrifying, while the climax involves a group of grey-painted guys with giant stone masks encircling their heads. Scary? No way. Absurd? Definitely. The fright value is somewhat diminished when one of the polystyrene masks slips forward and you see the flash of blond hair underneath. So did I like this film? Not really. It's so bad it's just, well...bad. However I will award it an extra mark because at least Hammer were trying something different instead of their usual Gothic horrors. Also, it might be worth watching for novelty value alone, but I wouldn't bank on it.

Reviewed by mark.waltz 9 / 10

A violent and realistic view of an unsettled world.

This film might not be for the squeamish. It is a view of the ancient world after the dinosaurs and before civilizations began, so you get to see the triumphs and tragedies and the survival of the fittest of prehistoric peoples. It is graphic and intense, showing how these people manage to survive against the odds whether dealing with enemies or natural phenomena such as volcanic eruptions. The attempts to find food leaves nothing to the imagination as antelope become fair game for undeveloped humans who simply reach into their hives to pull out meat and the nutrients that somehow they can get from the blood. There's even a little bit of cannibalism as evidenced by a man wanting control and taking a huge bite out of his rival.

Then there are tribes separated by looks, with darker hair prehistoric men coming up against lighter haired tribes, looking on each other in both fear and awe, and you never know how they are going to react. Surprisingly, among this seemingly barbaric world, there are often compromises and silent treaties of peace, and the site of the different colored hair tribes examining each other is both profound and funny.

Then there are the different views of each of their artistic attempts, and live entertainment are being performed for amusement. It's amazing because it shows the advancements of society before civilization really began, yet there is an underlying sense that it could turn at any minute back to violence and carnage. Even with just grunts and screaming and a minimal music score, this will keep your attention. Probably one of the underrated science fiction gems of the 1970's, although I really can't say how fictional or scientific it is.

Reviewed by Woodyanders 8 / 10

An admirable attempt at a credible portrayal of the harsh reality of life in the stone age

Two radically contrasting twin brothers fight over who's going to be the leader of their tribe of prehistoric cave people. Director Don Chaffey, working from a tight script by Michael Carreras, offers a compelling and convincing depiction of a brutal and dangerous world in which peril lurks around every corner, maintains a grimly serious tone throughout, and makes fine use of the desolate desert locations. Moreover, the cast manage to give their characters distinctive personalities despite only speaking through grunts and groans, with especially praiseworthy contributions from Tony Bonner and Robin John as the sparring siblings, Julie Ege as the feisty Nola, Rosalie Crutchley as a formidable old witch doctor type, and Marcia Fox as a persecuted mute. Kudos are also in order for Vincent G. Cox's often striking cinematography and Mario Nascimbene's throbbing tribal score. Better still, by firmly grounding the premise in a surprisingly plausible (albeit savage) primitive environment the filmmakers manage to give the central conflict between the two brothers a substantial amount of dramatic punch and weight. An effective and interesting film.

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