The Italian Job

1969

Action / Comedy / Crime / Thriller

21
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 81%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 86%
IMDb Rating 7.3 10 37443

Synopsis


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April 11, 2019 at 02:06 PM

Cast

Michael Caine as Charlie Croker
David Kelly as Vicar
Margaret Blye as Lorna
Frank Kelly as Prison Officer
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
835.52 MB
1280*544
English
NR
23.976 fps
1hr 39 min
P/S 7 / 19
1.58 GB
1920*816
English
NR
23.976 fps
1hr 39 min
P/S 4 / 21

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by The_Movie_Cat 8 / 10

"It is a work of genius."

In a sense I was disappointed to find that I actually liked The Italian Job. For after decades of imitations and student new-lad pub bores crowbarring "You're only supposed to blow the bloody doors off!" into conversation, I was all prepared to hate it.

Yet The Italian Job is a good film. A very good film in fact. First-class direction, all pans and upshot angles, and slyly political, though its "Cool Britannia" ethos almost seems to parody devotees of the Union Jack. Anyone watching this film for reconfirmation of the Empire is mistaken, though the team's final downfall notably comes from the only non-Caucasian member.

The humour is self-conscious, but never so that it goes too far; it's always witty. Michael Caine is the archetype Michael Caine, all pointing finger and raised-voice declarations, the version mimics love to portray. Noël Coward is able support in a straightish role, though the wonderful Benny Hill parodies his own image, thus diluting his already fine (And misunderstood) ironic take on the sexual pervert.

Screen realism is not an issue here, with a Mafia cameo who are hardly Don Corleone. Women are also marginalised, with only Maggie Blye getting a largish role as Caine's girlfriend, Lorna. This is the same girlfriend who hires six women to help celebrate his release from prison, and refers to fellow womankind as "birds". Yet while the film is a "boys only" club, it's far from a testosterone-led car chase, as Coward's appearance should attest. And what makes the final climatic chase so rewarding is that it's carefully, and intelligently, set up. The film is metaphorical where you wouldn't expect it to be, and well-acted all round.

All of which leaves me struggling for a way to end this review. Hang on a minute, lads, I've got an idea -

Reviewed by The_Void 8 / 10

A cultural masterpiece

The Italian Job is one of the best-loved British classics ever made. Most people in my home country of Britain have seen the film many times (most of those times spent drinking tea and speaking like the queen, of course), but there's more than enough for audiences from other countries to like about this delightful thriller as well. As you almost certainly already know, The Italian Job stars Michael Caine as the criminal at the centre of the job, dubbed 'The Italian Job' (would you believe). Caine is iconic in this film; his voice and mannerisms are often imitated, and it is this film that is probably most responsible for that. The plot follows Charlie Croker (Caine), a freshly released crook that, with a tip off from a deceased friend, decides to steal £4 million from Italy. However, it's not an easy job and there are many risks involved, so the job must be astutely planned and flawlessly executed for it to work right - and it is there that the film really takes off.

The Italian Job is well remembered for two things, the first of which is the Mini's. This is the film that made Mini's cool, so as you might expect, there is a fair amount of stunt work involving the Mini, a lot of which is truly spectacular - these little cars can be seen driving up stairs, onto and across roofs, through shopping centres, flying over various chasms etc and it's all very exciting. The second thing that it is remembered for is, of course, the line - "you were only supposed to blow the bloody doors off!", which is one of the most quoted of all time. The film's impact on popular culture has been immense, and that line's impact in particular is legendary; people that don't know the film know that line, and I dare say that a lot of them quote it even. It's up there with 'I'll be back' or 'that' line from Dirty Harry. The film also highlights a lot of British culture, most notably the reaction to something going right. English patriotism is a little different to the American version - while in America, the whole country may be united under the stars and stripes, very apple pie-like; England is much more content to chant a little inside of a prison. I know which version I prefer.

I could waffle on all day about this film, but we've both got better things to do, I'm sure so I'll finish by commenting on the ending; which is, simply, sublime and a perfect way to end the film; funny, well executed and absolutely genius. Well played.

Reviewed by sme_no_densetsu 8 / 10

A rollicking heist flick with the best car chase ever put on film

"The Italian Job" is a comedic heist film that is mostly renowned for the extended car chase getaway. In it, a thief recently released from prison (Michael Caine) organizes a scheme to steal a shipment of gold bars by creating a massive traffic jam and using a trio of Mini Coopers to escape with the loot.

The cast is pretty decent with the always dependable Caine perfectly cast as charismatic thief Charlie Croker, Noel Coward as the incarcerated backer of the titular job and Benny Hill in a small role as a computer expert obsessed with plump women. Besides that there's no-one worth remarking on and not much acting that isn't up to snuff.

The script is bold and inventive with much of the humour being understated and unpredictable. The heist itself is clever but the staging of the getaway is a real work of art. Again, there is an inventiveness that is quite refreshing. Nevertheless, I was starting to get a little tired of waiting for the heist to be set in motion. Finally, the ending caps the proceedings in memorable fashion.

The direction by Peter Collinson is solid and above average for an action-comedy. The music, handled by Quincy Jones, is memorable but also characteristic of the era, meaning that it is unlikely to appeal to all tastes.

If you're looking for a lighthearted crime caper this is just the ticket. I particularly recommend the film since it includes what is, in my opinion, the best car chase ever filmed.

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